How Far Can A Cockapoo Walk?

Rather than asking how far your Cockapoo can walk, you should instead be asking how far he or she should walk, especially if it’s still a puppy.

You see, Cockapoos are one of the dog types that are disposed to hip dysplasia. This means too much exercise before their bones are fully developed can lead to serious long-term health issues. But, on the other hand, no exercise at all is just as unhealthy.

So where is the happy medium? And what should you keep in mind when walking your Cockapoo?

How Long Can I walk My Cockapoo Puppy?

Experts recommend that you walk a puppy for five minutes per month of his age until he is fully grown. So, for example, 15 minutes at three months old, 25 minutes at five months, and 40 minutes at eight months. If necessary, these walks can be split up during the day so that your puppy doesn’t get over-tired. How often Should I walk my Puppy? Let’s find out!

Before 12 weeks old

Have you noticed, if your puppy is still with its mum, how she keeps it from wandering off too far? This allows pups to explore just enough without getting into too much trouble, and also gives them the opportunity to find their feet.

Rather than walking, puppies should get enough exercise from regulated playtime, with lots of rest in between at home and in the garden. Remember, your puppy shouldn’t be going for walks until he has had all his jabs, which is usually around 12 weeks old.

12 to 16 weeks

How far can a 12-week old puppy walk? This is the time when you can start getting your Cockapoo used to a leash. It is best to put it on when there are other things to keep him occupied, like playtime, or dinner time. It is also a good idea not to turn it into an event.

As soon as he looks comfortable with it on, you can start holding the leash. But don’t try and get him to ‘heel’ immediately. And don’t get annoyed. Take it slowly and let him come to you on his own, and include a lot of praise and a treat or two when he does.

16 weeks to 9 months old

This is where the fun begins.

At this stage, you and your pup can hit the road for proper walks. But don’t go all gung-ho and expect him to walk for hours. It is important that you slowly start building up his exercise time.

To do this, you can keep a diary, or make use of any one of these great walking apps to check you are pacing your pup correctly. Keep an eye out for signs that your Cockapoo is getting tired, and if necessary, carry him home or pop in the car.

9 to 18 months old

At 12 months your pooch has gotten into the full swing of walks, but even at this age his joints are still growing, so it is important to keep him from over-exercising. By 15 months, however, his bones and joints will be fully developed, and you can now let him walk (and run and play) until he is all ‘cockapooped’ out.

As a guide, you should walk an adult one hour for every 30 pounds, so if your Cockapoo is around 15 pounds, a 30-minute walk is advised. If your dog prefers longer or shorter walks, then you can adjust accordingly. After all, no one knows him better than you do.

In cases where your cockapoo is out of shape, hasn’t walked for a while or is overweight, we suggest you start with short walks and slowly build up.

Can A Cockapoo Walk 10 Miles?

It’s never quite as simple as asking, can a Cockapoo walk 10 miles? You could just as well ask, can a Cockapoo walk 1 mile? 

There are so many variables at work that there’s no simple answer. For example:

  • How old is the Cockapoo?
  • Is the dog overweight?
  • Does the dog have any fitness issues?
  • Does your Cockapoo suffer from arthritis?
  • How often do you exercise your Cockapoo?
  • What distance is your Cockapoo currently walking?
  • What type of terrain are you expecting to walk?
  • How hot is the weather? Heat exhaustion is a severe issue.

To get your Cockapoo used to walking long distances, you’ll need to start slowly and gradually increase the distance they walk. 

Both Cockers and Poodles are active dogs initially bred to work long and hard hours in all weather conditions. These genetics are undoubtedly where the Cockapoo gets all its energy. Cockapoos don’t do well if they don’t get enough exercise throughout the day. But typically, that is more likely to come from several different walks each day, all for much shorter lengths of time.

Walking ten miles in one stint is a slightly different proposition.

I’m not saying a young, healthy Cockapoo couldn’t take on ten miles in their sleep because they probably could and still be lively enough at the end of the walk.

But to go back to what I mentioned previously, it’s not so straightforward, and you need to consider the above conditions.

Can You Over-Exercise A Cockapoo? 

It’s a crucial question because the answer is absolute. Yes, you can over-exercise a Cockapoo; you can over-exercise any dog, even hounds that live for running. Cockapoos’ exercise requirements vary widely depending on a dog’s age, breed, health, and fitness level, the same way they do for humans.

If you haven’t regularly exercised for several months and you suddenly decided to go on a ten-mile run, it’s improbable that you would even finish.

Even if you have put yourself through a strict exercise regimen to get into shape, you can’t expect your Cockapoo to keep up with you if you’re training for the next half marathon.

Signs Of Over-Exercising Your Cockapoo

If your Cockapoo is being over-exercised, it will show several symptoms. Most dogs will keep going through the discomfort to keep up with you; you must keep your eye out for your Cockapoo in these circumstances. 

  • General Soreness: Sore and stiff muscles after exercise is a good indication that your Cockapoo has had more exercise than it should. Let your dog take it easy for the next few days and go for a few short walks. 
  • Exercise Exhaustion: While it’s normal for a dog to take a nap after a workout, it may be too much for them if they don’t want to leave their bed all day.
  • Refusing to keep up during exercise: If you find that your Cockapoo is hanging back or slowing down significantly during exercise, they are struggling, for whatever reason. Consider stopping and giving your dog a treat and some water if this happens while you’re out walking (have some on hand at all times),  return home the quickest way possible.
  • Heat Exhaustion: It can be exceptionally dangerous if a dog suffers from heat exhaustion. Be extra careful you don’t over-exercise your dog in hot weather. Scorching weather can overcome even the fittest dogs. 

Build Up Your Cockapoos Fitness Levels

Unless your Cockapoo already has boundless energy and you often go on long walks together, then you’ll need to build up their fitness levels first before you undertake anything like a ten-mile or more hike.

A Few Handy Tips for Walking Your Cockapoo

  • Make sure you have a poo bag with you on your walks. It really is just common courtesy to clean up after your pooch.
  • If you are making a day of it, plan a route with stops that are dog-friendly. Remember basic ‘petiquette’ when you are out in public with your pup. This means making sure he is tagged, has a collar and leash, for example.
  • There are some incredible places to walk your dog around the UK. Spend a little time online to find new and exciting spots to explore, including Canal and River Trust, the Woodland Trust, British Waterways as well as Hikideas, a website that allows you to create your own walks or find walks near you

5 thoughts on “How Far Can A Cockapoo Walk?”

  1. I wanted to know when you are training your cockapoo when you are able to stop treating or expect your pup to do it without needed a treat for promosion

    Reply
  2. We live in the Lake District and would like a dog which can accompany us on walks/hikes. When full grown would a toy cockerpoo (springer/cocker/toy poodle cross) be up for a days walking?

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    • Yes! My 14 month cockapoo accompanies me on hikes both in the morning and afternoon. Generally 45 to 1 hour each and she could easily go more. She gets about three hours walking/running everyday unless there is really bad weather. In the winter months when the foliage is all gone, she runs circles in the forest at top speed, sniffing and searching for prey. She loves to chase rabbits, dodging trees at a sprint, but they are far too fast. Now there’s really nothing that she can catch, but she’s game anyway. In winter, she can range without discomfort in minus 10 Celsius no problem. Summer months, she doesn’t stray too far from the trail for some reason. I need to bring plenty of water. She isn’t good in the direct heat but the forest canopy shelters her enough. I don’t take her past dusk since she is so curious that she’d probably want to play with a fox and at 23 pounds wouldn’t stand a chance I reckon. Better safe than sorry. She’s an amazing, lovable companion on hikes for sure, especially in winter.

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